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YMI Consulting

None of it matters if you don't stay the course.

@SarahVitort and @InfinitRakz in the studio

@SarahVitort and @InfinitRakz in the studio

This isn’t going to be easy.

Throughout this four-part series (well five –I added a bit about constraints,) I threw quite a bit of information on the table to think about. It can be overwhelming to look at your creative endeavor as a business, as there is a lot of back-end work that must be done, which no one sees or appreciates. It’s as if you must impede the creative process in order to research, plan, strategize, then set tactics; it’s a lot of work. However, I say that the back-end work needs to be done in tandem with the creative process. As a matter of fact, that work will catalyze the creative process, because then the creative work becomes something more –a marketable product –and there is an end-goal in sight.

Once you’ve put in that work –stay the course! All of that time spent brainstorming, writing things down, arguing, and discussing isn’t just a task. It’s the foundation to your career. The more reason to stay the course is that your fan attrition-rate will be more consistent. Every time a strategy, brand, or marketing plan takes an unexpected turn, you risk losing fans. Fans are gained through experience expectations. In other words, you’ve earned a fan because you’ve “wowed” her with the holistic experience –from the music to the visuals, live performance, logos, merchandise, etc. If she comes to the next show, and you’ve scrapped your original plan, that wow-factor may dissipate and you’ve lost that fan. It takes a lot more energy and resources to gain a fan, than to keep a fan. Fans are the people that will keep you motivated and are the basis to your support.

You can’t go it alone –find a partner.

@YuriyM, Manager, and @SarahVitort at the pseudoboss album release in January 2016.

As you begin to adopt the business methodology proposed, you’ll come to realize that you can’t do it alone. Entrepreneurs can only go so far on their own. Eventually they will need someone to manage the business while they continue to do what inspired them to go into business in the first place. Let’s face it: once music becomes work, it’s not fun anymore. My recommendation is to harness your relationships, find people that believe in you, and have passions in other fields or industries. Let me tell you –they’re out there, and all you have to do is ask for help. Gain their support and trust, work together, and make them partners in your success.

Think of YCMsquared as your partner. We are here to help you gain insight through our blogs, interactions with artists at shows, and business proposals. Through our partner network, we’ll help get quicker access to resources, as we’ve done all of the leg-work to get you the best. Feel free to send me an email –yuriy@ycmsquared.com or connect with me on Twitter.

About the Author

I Get Things Done. Let's grow your business together!
I Get Things Done. Let's grow your business together!

2 Comments

  1. 3 Factors to Building Solid Teams | YCM² Says :
    Posted on January 25, 2016 at 8:26 pm

    […] to getting you to think about your music career as an entrepreneur and a business, I mentioned that finding a partner in your success is crucial. Taking it a step further, creating a solid team with various, yet […]

  2. 3 Factors to Building Solid Teams | Musician's Knowledge Vault Says :
    Posted on February 7, 2016 at 7:40 am

    […] to getting you to think about your music career as an entrepreneur and a business, I mentioned that finding a partner in your success is crucial. Taking it a step further, creating a solid team with various, yet […]